Powerstrips Connected to Powerstrips
coolpages:

Spider-Man: Fear Itself (Marvel Comics - February 1992)
Writers: Gerry Conway (Plot/Script) & Stan Lee (Script)Illustrators: Ross Andru (Pencils) & Mike Esposito (Inks)

coolpages:

Spider-Man: Fear Itself (Marvel Comics - February 1992)

Writers: Gerry Conway (Plot/Script) & Stan Lee (Script)
Illustrators: Ross Andru (Pencils) & Mike Esposito (Inks)

chimpendale:

the Black Tower is just a sunset in a puddle away

chimpendale:

the Black Tower is just a sunset in a puddle away

lucyknisley:

I like swimming.

lucyknisley:

I like swimming.

koyamapress:

Safari Honeymoon, Jesse Jacobs’ chronicle of creepy creatures and naïve newlyweds, continues to be a critical darling with a review in Booklist and a place on the top 6 books 2014 (so far) at Comic Book Resources.
From Booklist
“Prime strange amusement.” — Ray Olson, Booklist
From Comic Book Resources“What at first seems like a familiar story trope — an older, rich lout and nubile, young wife go on safari led by a macho, knowledgeable guide — becomes under Jacobs’ hands something altogether strange, haunting, unexpected and altogether extraordinary.” — Chris Mautner, Comic Book Resources

This is probably my favorite comic of 2014, which is saying something. A perfect book

koyamapress:

Safari HoneymoonJesse Jacobs’ chronicle of creepy creatures and naïve newlyweds, continues to be a critical darling with a review in Booklist and a place on the top 6 books 2014 (so far) at Comic Book Resources.

From Booklist

“Prime strange amusement.” — Ray Olson, Booklist

From Comic Book Resources

“What at first seems like a familiar story trope — an older, rich lout and nubile, young wife go on safari led by a macho, knowledgeable guide — becomes under Jacobs’ hands something altogether strange, haunting, unexpected and altogether extraordinary.” — Chris Mautner, Comic Book Resources

This is probably my favorite comic of 2014, which is saying something. A perfect book

brianmichaelbendis:

Wolverine by Geoff Darrow

brianmichaelbendis:

Wolverine by Geoff Darrow

boomerstarkiller67:

Gorilla Soldiers - Planet of the Apes (1968)

Lunch poem— 7/12

He wears reading glasses—
not the tinted ones you see
his brother wear on the red carpet,
but thick glasses that ease
the distance into focus

and he explains to me that Robin
really is his brother even though they don’t share
a last name. And this is because
his parents named one kid
William Robins and one kid
Robin Williams.

It’s raining like continuous
confetti cannon blasts as William
expresses regret that he introduced
Robin to cocaine, and then expresses
anger that he had originally invented Mork,
but his version was Quork,
and Robin stole the character and became Robin
while William went into real estate.

We look out the window
of the condo William is showing me
and the rain makes everything dark
enough that his face reflects
in the window and instead of looking
outside, I focus on this face
that belongs to a man so sad
that he was even jealous
of RV.

gameraboy:

Sir Hiss takes flight. Robin Hood (1973)

gameraboy:

Sir Hiss takes flight. Robin Hood (1973)

koyamapress:

Renee French and a moustachioed friend preview her new book Baby Bjornstrand. Coming this Fall!

seanhowe:

boomerstarkiller67:

Original art by Jim Starlin (1973)

“I was just as crazy as everybody else post-Watergate, post-Vietnam,” said Starlin, whose hobbies included motorcycles, chess, and lysergic acid diethylamide–25. “Each one of those stories was me taking that stuff that had gone before and trying to put my personal slant on it. Mar-Vell was a warrior who decided he was going to become a god, and that’s where his trip was.” In the pages of Captain Marvel, existence itself might be altered several times in the course of an issue. “There is a moment of change, then reality becomes a thing of the past!” howls the evil ruler Thanos, before everything morphs into funhouse-mirror images. His sworn enemy Drax responds: “My mind and my soul are one—my soul—an immortal intangible, nothing and everything! That which cannot die cannot be enslaved, for only with fear is servitude rendered!” On the following page, Drax’s shifting realities are represented by thirty-five panels of warped faces, skulls, eyes, stars, and lizards. Captain Marvel had practically become a black-light poster with dialogue. Its sales kept increasing. Soon Starlin was opening his fan mail and finding complimentary joints sent by grateful, mind-blown readers.—Marvel Comics: The Untold Story


Jim Starlin, probably my favorite superhero comics writer

seanhowe:

boomerstarkiller67:

Original art by Jim Starlin (1973)

“I was just as crazy as everybody else post-Watergate, post-Vietnam,” said Starlin, whose hobbies included motorcycles, chess, and lysergic acid diethylamide–25. “Each one of those stories was me taking that stuff that had gone before and trying to put my personal slant on it. Mar-Vell was a warrior who decided he was going to become a god, and that’s where his trip was.” In the pages of Captain Marvel, existence itself might be altered several times in the course of an issue. “There is a moment of change, then reality becomes a thing of the past!” howls the evil ruler Thanos, before everything morphs into funhouse-mirror images. His sworn enemy Drax responds: “My mind and my soul are one—my soul—an immortal intangible, nothing and everything! That which cannot die cannot be enslaved, for only with fear is servitude rendered!” On the following page, Drax’s shifting realities are represented by thirty-five panels of warped faces, skulls, eyes, stars, and lizards. Captain Marvel had practically become a black-light poster with dialogue. Its sales kept increasing. Soon Starlin was opening his fan mail and finding complimentary joints sent by grateful, mind-blown readers.

Marvel Comics: The Untold Story

Jim Starlin, probably my favorite superhero comics writer